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Complications That Can Arise from Spaying a Cat

An uncommon complication after spaying your pets is internal bleeding. This may be either a result of a spaying procedure that was not done properly where a blood vessel was not securely tied off or when a cat has existing blood clotting disorders.

Cat Spaying Overview

Cat spaying, also referred to as female neutering, desexing and female sterilization, is a surgical operation performed by a veterinarian to take out the reproductive system of female cats. The organs removed consist of the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and uterus. This procedure is performed to control the cat population, to modify cat behaviour, to control genetic feline diseases, and to maintain the overall health of female cats. Female neutering is a generally safe procedure, but there are some surgical cat spaying complications that should be considered prior to undergoing this operation.

Pain and Discomfort

Bluesmoke Maine Coon Female cat

Some of the most common complications of spaying are pain and discomfort. Cats usually express pain and discomfort in the form of trembling, refusing to settle or sit, growling, panting, hissing, hiding, adopting a stiff leg gait or biting its stitches.

After surgery, the cats are usually sent home and owners are advised to give medications their pain symptoms. If your pets were not given analgesics, however, and you’ve observed the symptoms of pain and discomfort in them, it is recommendable to call or return to the veterinarian and seek his advice.

Cats that just came from surgery should be kept indoors to prevent active movement which may aggravate these symptoms. Thirty to forty-five minutes of alternate hot and cold compress, for about ten minutes each, is recommended to reduce the pain and discomfort.

Swelling

Another frequent cat spaying complication is swelling at the incision site, which can be identified as inflammatory swelling, seroma, hernia or abscess. Inflammatory swelling can be a result of trauma in the tissues around the surgical site or may also be the natural healing response of the body to the procedure. Seroma is a big lump formed at the incision site when a dead space in subcutaneous fat layer occurs as an outcome of the surgical process. Hernia is a lump that happens when the walls of the abdomen break down and internal organs protrude through it. Abscesses are infected seromas that are usually hot and painful to touch. When any lump or swelling arise, it is often best to bring your pets to the veterinarian for proper assessment and management.

Infection

Infection is one more notable complication that can happen internally or externally. They develop when bacteria and other organisms invade the area surrounding the surgical site. This often results in limited healing, massive inflammation and pus build up. It has higher chances of developing when the incision site is damp and unclean. Be sure to observe signs of infection such as warmth, redness, swelling, itchiness, and discharge at the site. Upon seeing these symptoms, it is advisable to contact your veterinarian immediately for treatment.

Incision Breakdown

A moderately occurring cat spaying complication is incision breakdown seen as a fleshly, rotten looking hole in the abdomen of cats. Wound breakdown may occur from neglectful care at home after surgery, where spayed cats are permitted to be overly active around the house and allowed to lick their incision site. These result in premature incision breakdown possibly producing infection or bleeding. Immediate consultation with the veterinarian is often necessary.

Internal Bleeding

An uncommon complication after spaying your pets is internal bleeding. This may be either a result of a spaying procedure that was not done properly where a blood vessel was not securely tied off or when a cat has existing blood clotting disorders. Usual signs of internal bleeding are sluggishness, pale gums, and bloated abdomen. It is also best to contact the veterinarian for management of this condition.

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