Airfare Daily Deals eCigarettes Eyeglasses Hotels Jewelry Online Backup Online Dating Online Printing Online Tickets Skin Care Textbook Rentals Vitamins Web Hosting Weddings
Get reviews, comparisons, and deals for popular retailers and brands
SEARCH

The Importance of Feline Vaccinations

Vaccinations are an important part of preventative care for cats. While all healthy cats need certain core vaccines, veterinarians and owners choose other vaccines depending on each cat's lifestyle and environment. The importance of vaccinations described in this article is necessary for the good health and happiness of all cats.

Vaccinations are an important part of preventative care for cats. While all healthy cats need certain core vaccines, veterinarians and owners choose other vaccines depending on each cat's lifestyle and environment. While vaccines are very safe and effective, there are possible side effects which range from mild pain to rare, though serious, complications.

Vaccination Types

Many types of vaccines exist for cats. The two most common cat vaccines are rabies and FVRCP (feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia), a vaccine against feline respiratory viruses and panleukopenia, the parvovirus of cats. Other available cat vaccines include feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, feline infectious peritonitis, chlamydophila felis, bordetella bronchiseptica and feline giardia.

Reasons to Vaccinate

In most states, the rabies vaccine is legally required for all pet cats. Rabies is a serious, though preventable, disease that cats can pass to humans and other animals. Vaccinating cats against rabies is important for public health as well as the health of individual cats.  Other feline vaccinations prevent additional serious and sometimes fatal diseases. The vaccine that each cat needs depends on its lifestyle. An indoor cat with limited exposure to new cats needs only FVRCP and rabies, the core feline vaccines. There are additional vaccinations that are recommended for outdoor cats, shelter cats and cats in homes where they will have contact with new cats. It is always important for owners to consult with their veterinarians to decide on an appropriate vaccination program for their cats.

Complications

The most common complication of feline vaccinations is mild pain or swelling at the vaccination site and lethargy. These complications typically resolve within a day or two. Allergic reactions are also possible, but rare. Signs of an allergic reaction to a vaccine may include vomiting, diarrhea, face swelling and difficulty swallowing. Such reactions can be fatal if left untreated, but treated cats typically recover very quickly. In addition to these complications, there is the potential for cats to develop tumors called vaccine-induced sarcomas. These tumors are, fortunately, rare, but they are very aggressive. For this reason, any lump that occurs at the site of a previous vaccination needs to be checked by a veterinarian.      

Summary

Young children are often highly susceptible to catching a virus from another child because they have yet to understand the benefits of washing hands or covering mouths when they sneeze. While they eventually learn, pets are never able to make these connections or perform these actions. Because of this, vaccines to protect them from viruses need to be administered.  Keeping a cat up to date with their vaccinations will keep them healthy and happy.

Sources:

www.avma.org

www.petmd.com

Need an answer?
Get insightful answers from community-recommended
experts
in Cats on Knoji.
Would you recommend this author as an expert in Cats?
You have 0 recommendations remaining to grant today.
Comments (0)
ARTICLE DETAILS
RELATED ARTICLES
ARTICLE KEYWORDS